Search results for: Invited firms

Your new position: Managing Director

zumodeempleo.com

Invited firm: María Luisa Moreno Cobián

 

zumodeempleo.com

@ZumoDeEmpleo

I propose a complete change of mindset. A way of looking at your search that will take a lot of pressure off you.

There is a company that has a goal for 2015, and to achieve it, it wants to hire you as Managing Director.

The company’s goal is to get a specific customer to buy the company’s star product.

You have 12 months to:

Get to know the product. You have to know how it is created, its qualities, benefits for the user, sales price.

Get to know the potential customers. You must know who might be interested in the product, how they will use it/what benefits they will obtain, discover who makes the decision to buy these products, try to contact people within the company for information, get them to tell you how things work from the inside.

And finally, you must propose a good strategy so that your potential customers hear about your product and then get a sales meeting with them.

Now I’m going to reveal the name of the company and the product:

The company is You Ltd.

The product is Your Work

You’re the Managing Director of You Ltd. and you have 12 months to get a customer to sign a contract to buy your product (your work) for a period of time

This is how I propose you approach your search from now on. By separating yourself from the process emotionally and thinking of it as a job. Let me explain why:

Work is our livelihood – what lets us eat, have a roof over our head, get around, live. In other words: it’s an ESSENTIAL part of our lives, and therefore: if we don’t have it (as it is necessary for our survival and our basic needs), or if we do but it’s not the job we want (for the emotional toll it causes), it always has an immense personal and emotional effect.

This means that we take our job searching process too “personally” (which it undoubtedly is), getting so caught up in the problem that we can’t see any further, we don’t find solutions, get frustrated and cornered into a situation with no personal resources to get out of it.

And I ask you: What do you gain by taking it so personally? What if you change your perspective? What if you DETACH yourself emotionally from what you have to do to achieve it?

But you must consider these three conditions:

ONE: No EXCUSES – like any job, when you have to resolve something, you do what you have do to resolve it. In other words: you must consider it as your job, go to your (virtual) office every day, set daily/weekly/monthly targets and make sure you meet them.

TWO: Don’t follow the same path as everyone else – job websites are SATURATED. Your potential customer won’t find you there and be able to evaluate your product. Think: How did the Managing Director of a rival company who has managed to successfully sell their product do it? How did they publicise their product? How did they get contacts and people to talk about their product? IMAGINATION RULES.

AND THREE: See each recruitment interview that goes badly, where you can’t “sell” your product, as a NORMAL result of a sales process. You have to talk to and try to convince quite a few potential customers until one buys your product. This way you can learn from each of them and approach it in a very different way.

Think about it. I challenge you. Adopt this mindset and you’ll see how this change of scenario, this “emotional” liberation and separation from the process, will let you see things differently.

Do you accept the challenge?

 

Other posts by Maria Luisa Moreno

Your new position: Managing Director

zumodeempleo.com

Invited firm: María Luisa Moreno Cobián

 

zumodeempleo.com

@ZumoDeEmpleo

I propose a complete change of mindset. A way of looking at your search that will take a lot of pressure off you.

There is a company that has a goal for 2015, and to achieve it, it wants to hire you as Managing Director.

The company’s goal is to get a specific customer to buy the company’s star product.

You have 12 months to:

Get to know the product. You have to know how it is created, its qualities, benefits for the user, sales price.

Get to know the potential customers. You must know who might be interested in the product, how they will use it/what benefits they will obtain, discover who makes the decision to buy these products, try to contact people within the company for information, get them to tell you how things work from the inside.

And finally, you must propose a good strategy so that your potential customers hear about your product and then get a sales meeting with them.

Now I’m going to reveal the name of the company and the product:

The company is You Ltd.

The product is Your Work

You’re the Managing Director of You Ltd. and you have 12 months to get a customer to sign a contract to buy your product (your work) for a period of time

This is how I propose you approach your search from now on. By separating yourself from the process emotionally and thinking of it as a job. Let me explain why:

Work is our livelihood – what lets us eat, have a roof over our head, get around, live. In other words: it’s an ESSENTIAL part of our lives, and therefore: if we don’t have it (as it is necessary for our survival and our basic needs), or if we do but it’s not the job we want (for the emotional toll it causes), it always has an immense personal and emotional effect.

This means that we take our job searching process too “personally” (which it undoubtedly is), getting so caught up in the problem that we can’t see any further, we don’t find solutions, get frustrated and cornered into a situation with no personal resources to get out of it.

And I ask you: What do you gain by taking it so personally? What if you change your perspective? What if you DETACH yourself emotionally from what you have to do to achieve it?

But you must consider these three conditions:

ONE: No EXCUSES – like any job, when you have to resolve something, you do what you have do to resolve it. In other words: you must consider it as your job, go to your (virtual) office every day, set daily/weekly/monthly targets and make sure you meet them.

TWO: Don’t follow the same path as everyone else – job websites are SATURATED. Your potential customer won’t find you there and be able to evaluate your product. Think: How did the Managing Director of a rival company who has managed to successfully sell their product do it? How did they publicise their product? How did they get contacts and people to talk about their product? IMAGINATION RULES.

AND THREE: See each recruitment interview that goes badly, where you can’t “sell” your product, as a NORMAL result of a sales process. You have to talk to and try to convince quite a few potential customers until one buys your product. This way you can learn from each of them and approach it in a very different way.

Think about it. I challenge you. Adopt this mindset and you’ll see how this change of scenario, this “emotional” liberation and separation from the process, will let you see things differently.

Do you accept the challenge?

 

Other posts by Maria Luisa Moreno

True leadership is accepting your own responsibility

Francisco Alcaide

Invited firm: Francisco Alcaide Hernández

 

Expert in Personal Development and Management
www.franciscoalcaide.com | @falcaide

If we had to sum it up in one word, it would be self-reliance. Successful people are those who focus on ‘what am I going to’ and unsuccessful people focus on ‘what’s going to happen’. If you let your life depend on the crisis ending or certain people taking decisions, time can pass and you can still be in the same situation. There’s nothing worse than ‘passive hope’; wanting things to simply change over time.

People who are self-reliant are firmly focused on ‘solutions’ and non-self-reliant people focus firmly on ‘excuses’; and the danger of looking for excuses is that you always find them. It’s not hard to find something or someone to blame for our lives not being what we would like them to be.

People have an amazing ability to explain success as something ‘internal’ (I’m good, I’ve worked for it, I’ve been trying a long time…) and failure as something ‘external’ (the crisis, financial markets, the government, education…): a symmetrical way of looking at reality.

Why do many people blame their businesses closing on the crisis but nobody attributes their success to economic growth? Was the crisis really responsible for businesses closing or an inability to foresee where trends were heading, or excessive relaxation, or a lack of flexibility to adapt, or excess spending in good times?

The crisis is just a symptom (result) but not the cause (person). You don’t drown because you fall in the water (effect) but because you can’t swim (cause). We live in a world of causes and effects, and every effect (result) is the result of a cause (person). Here are some examples:

–      The lack of money a person earns (effect = result) isn’t the problem, it is just a symptom of the real problem: their inability to generate income (cause = person).

–      The lack of a person’s contacts (effect = result) isn’t the problem, it is just a symptom of the real problem: their inability to develop and strengthen relationships.

–      A person’s bad health (effect = result) isn’t the problem, it is just a symptom of the real problem: their poor lifestyle habits.

In short, you are the problem but also the solution. To be successful the first thing you have to do is take responsibility for yourself. Success comes from investing in your own personal development: learning more to earn more. Your personal development is your goal. And the more you invest in yourself, the better opportunities you will have in life. The more you study, the more you train, the more you network, the more experiences you have… the better you will do. Personal development is simply increasing life options, broadening possibilities, in short, increasing your chances of being successful. According to Brian Tracy, one of the authors included in Aprendiendo de los mejores (Alienta, 7th Spanish edition): “Personal development is your springboard to personal excellence. Ongoing, continuous, it assures you that there is no limit to what you can accomplish”.

 

Post related:

5 types of commitment to ensure success

True leadership is accepting your own responsibility

Francisco Alcaide

Invited firm: Francisco Alcaide Hernández

 

Expert in Personal Development and Management
www.franciscoalcaide.com | @falcaide

If we had to sum it up in one word, it would be self-reliance. Successful people are those who focus on ‘what am I going to’ and unsuccessful people focus on ‘what’s going to happen’. If you let your life depend on the crisis ending or certain people taking decisions, time can pass and you can still be in the same situation. There’s nothing worse than ‘passive hope’; wanting things to simply change over time.

People who are self-reliant are firmly focused on ‘solutions’ and non-self-reliant people focus firmly on ‘excuses’; and the danger of looking for excuses is that you always find them. It’s not hard to find something or someone to blame for our lives not being what we would like them to be.

People have an amazing ability to explain success as something ‘internal’ (I’m good, I’ve worked for it, I’ve been trying a long time…) and failure as something ‘external’ (the crisis, financial markets, the government, education…): a symmetrical way of looking at reality.

Why do many people blame their businesses closing on the crisis but nobody attributes their success to economic growth? Was the crisis really responsible for businesses closing or an inability to foresee where trends were heading, or excessive relaxation, or a lack of flexibility to adapt, or excess spending in good times?

The crisis is just a symptom (result) but not the cause (person). You don’t drown because you fall in the water (effect) but because you can’t swim (cause). We live in a world of causes and effects, and every effect (result) is the result of a cause (person). Here are some examples:

–      The lack of money a person earns (effect = result) isn’t the problem, it is just a symptom of the real problem: their inability to generate income (cause = person).

–      The lack of a person’s contacts (effect = result) isn’t the problem, it is just a symptom of the real problem: their inability to develop and strengthen relationships.

–      A person’s bad health (effect = result) isn’t the problem, it is just a symptom of the real problem: their poor lifestyle habits.

In short, you are the problem but also the solution. To be successful the first thing you have to do is take responsibility for yourself. Success comes from investing in your own personal development: learning more to earn more. Your personal development is your goal. And the more you invest in yourself, the better opportunities you will have in life. The more you study, the more you train, the more you network, the more experiences you have… the better you will do. Personal development is simply increasing life options, broadening possibilities, in short, increasing your chances of being successful. According to Brian Tracy, one of the authors included in Aprendiendo de los mejores (Alienta, 7th Spanish edition): “Personal development is your springboard to personal excellence. Ongoing, continuous, it assures you that there is no limit to what you can accomplish”.

 

Post related:

5 types of commitment to ensure success

By the time you arrive at the interview you’ve already got the job (or not)

zumodeempleo.com

Invited firm: María Luisa Moreno Cobián

 

zumodeempleo.com

@ZumoDeEmpleo

 

Most people want to know that magic phrase that’ll get them through the interview and land them the job. But the truth is surprisingly different: 80% of your chance of getting that job has to be created BEFORE you reach the interviewer’s office.

The first mistake people make is thinking job interviews are about “answering questions”. That’s how you could let the job slip away. A job interview is about being able to tell your story coherently and getting your key messages across.

You can’t do that if you leave what happens in the interview room to chance. If you don’t do your homework, what will give you that edge in the interview? If you don’t research the job’s key challenges, the main difficulties the company is facing, if you don’t know who they work with, what their objectives are or what they need, there’s no way you’ll be able to convince them that you can make a positive contribution.

Not only that, but the more you know about the company, their situation and circumstances, the more you’ll be able to speak their language and tailor your message.

Here are the key questions that’ll make the difference and help you stand out from other candidates:

  • Do you know exactly what the recruiter is looking for?
  • Are you able to convey your story in a way that resonates and convinces them you are the perfect person for the job?
  • Do you have a contact inside the company?

Three questions that you should be able to answer positively and that make up 80% of your chances of landing the job. And yet, 99% of candidates don’t do their homework, and turn up at the interview leaving their fate to chance.

Don’t let it happen to you!

  1. What’s the recruiter looking for?

Yes, we may have a romantic view of the job, “I want to contribute and maximise my potential and capacity for learning and growth in an environment which allows me to grow as a professional and as a person…” and blah, blah, blah. But think about that subtle detail  that makes ALL the difference: as I said before, what’s the recruiter looking for?

The job interview is about what the recruiter needs.

Something is bothering them, bugging them, they have an itch and they need to know if you have the medicine or remedy to fix it and if you know how to administer it. That’s it! If you don’t know what they need or what problem they need solving, how can you know if you’re the right person for the job? And what’s worse, how can you convince them?

  1. How can you tell your story and show that you’re the right candidate for the job?

There’s an acronym used constantly in companies that you probably already know: ROI. It stands for “Return on Investment”, the benefits you get by investing.

When you realise you have to show them that they’ll get ROI by recruiting you, you’ll have taken “a small step for man, but a giant leap for …” your career 😉 . Setting out your campaign in terms of ROI is probably one of the most efficient ways of persuading the recruiter that you’re the right person for the job.

If you have experience relevant to the job, show the recruiter (SHOW, don’t tell) how you’re going to solve their problems. How do you show it? With your past results! SPECIFIC details of how you solved similar problems for others. Specific means giving numbers, comparisons, MEASURABLE results.

  1. How do you manage your contacts? 

If you’re sending CV after CV you’ve already failed. Successful people invest time choosing what companies they want to work for before sending a single CV. They then try and get contacts in those companies through different networking strategies, so when the time comes to send the CV, they’ve already maximised their chances of getting the job.

Compare this with people who send out lots of CVs from the start, to all the job seeking websites and every company, hoping for a lucky break. It may seem productive, but when MILLIONS of other people are doing the same thing and it’s not working for them, it’s time to change strategy, don’t you think?

Trust me. Do all this and you’ll be way ahead of the other candidates.

 

By the time you arrive at the interview you’ve already got the job (or not)

zumodeempleo.com

Invited firm: María Luisa Moreno Cobián

 

zumodeempleo.com

@ZumoDeEmpleo

 

Most people want to know that magic phrase that’ll get them through the interview and land them the job. But the truth is surprisingly different: 80% of your chance of getting that job has to be created BEFORE you reach the interviewer’s office.

The first mistake people make is thinking job interviews are about “answering questions”. That’s how you could let the job slip away. A job interview is about being able to tell your story coherently and getting your key messages across.

You can’t do that if you leave what happens in the interview room to chance. If you don’t do your homework, what will give you that edge in the interview? If you don’t research the job’s key challenges, the main difficulties the company is facing, if you don’t know who they work with, what their objectives are or what they need, there’s no way you’ll be able to convince them that you can make a positive contribution.

Not only that, but the more you know about the company, their situation and circumstances, the more you’ll be able to speak their language and tailor your message.

Here are the key questions that’ll make the difference and help you stand out from other candidates:

  • Do you know exactly what the recruiter is looking for?
  • Are you able to convey your story in a way that resonates and convinces them you are the perfect person for the job?
  • Do you have a contact inside the company?

Three questions that you should be able to answer positively and that make up 80% of your chances of landing the job. And yet, 99% of candidates don’t do their homework, and turn up at the interview leaving their fate to chance.

Don’t let it happen to you!

  1. What’s the recruiter looking for?

Yes, we may have a romantic view of the job, “I want to contribute and maximise my potential and capacity for learning and growth in an environment which allows me to grow as a professional and as a person…” and blah, blah, blah. But think about that subtle detail  that makes ALL the difference: as I said before, what’s the recruiter looking for?

The job interview is about what the recruiter needs.

Something is bothering them, bugging them, they have an itch and they need to know if you have the medicine or remedy to fix it and if you know how to administer it. That’s it! If you don’t know what they need or what problem they need solving, how can you know if you’re the right person for the job? And what’s worse, how can you convince them?

  1. How can you tell your story and show that you’re the right candidate for the job?

There’s an acronym used constantly in companies that you probably already know: ROI. It stands for “Return on Investment”, the benefits you get by investing.

When you realise you have to show them that they’ll get ROI by recruiting you, you’ll have taken “a small step for man, but a giant leap for …” your career 😉 . Setting out your campaign in terms of ROI is probably one of the most efficient ways of persuading the recruiter that you’re the right person for the job.

If you have experience relevant to the job, show the recruiter (SHOW, don’t tell) how you’re going to solve their problems. How do you show it? With your past results! SPECIFIC details of how you solved similar problems for others. Specific means giving numbers, comparisons, MEASURABLE results.

  1. How do you manage your contacts? 

If you’re sending CV after CV you’ve already failed. Successful people invest time choosing what companies they want to work for before sending a single CV. They then try and get contacts in those companies through different networking strategies, so when the time comes to send the CV, they’ve already maximised their chances of getting the job.

Compare this with people who send out lots of CVs from the start, to all the job seeking websites and every company, hoping for a lucky break. It may seem productive, but when MILLIONS of other people are doing the same thing and it’s not working for them, it’s time to change strategy, don’t you think?

Trust me. Do all this and you’ll be way ahead of the other candidates.

 

5 types of commitment to ensure success

Francisco Alcaide

Invited firm: Francisco Alcaide Hernández

 

Expert in Personal Development and Management
www.franciscoalcaide.com | @falcaide

If there is one variable that sets successful people apart it’s a commitment to achieving their goals.And that means doing what is necessary for as long as necessary. Specifically, commitment can be divided into five types to ensure success. These are:

1. COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE
Excellent people are offered excellent opportunities. Normal people are offered normal opportunities. And bad people are not offered opportunities. Leave mediocrity aside once and for all. Always ask yourself how you can add more value to what you do: be faster, cheaper, offer better quality. Don’t settle for average work. It’s easily perceived and works against you. Remember: be so good at what you do that it’s impossible for others to ignore you. When you do something (lecture, post, workshop, class), give it your all. Life gives you back what you give it: the more you give to others, the more you’ll get back. As David Schwartz says in Aprendiendo de los mejores (Alienta, 6ª edition): «There is never competition at the top; competition is at a mediocre level».

2. COMMITMENT TO LEARNING
You can’t win more by giving less. If you want your life to improve, you need to improve. Never stop investing in yourself and your business. Always assign resources to your personal development (books, seminars, audiobooks, meals with interesting people) and what you do: improving the website, the sales channels, the PR, the advertising, whatever. Part of your income should always be allocated to that type of investment. Today, he who does not advance, retreats; he who doesn’t improve, worsens. In brief: Do you want to earn an above average income? Then become an above average person. Your personal development is your goal. Your income can only grow as much as you grow.

3. COMMITMENT TO SOLUTIONS
Successful people are focused on solutions. Unsuccessful people are focused on excuses. The problem of looking for excuses is that if you look for them, you’ll always find them. It’s never hard to find someone to blame. Life is about managing problems, one after another: problems with suppliers, with clients, with collaborators… Not having problems is a real problem, because it means that you’re not doing anything, and that’s really bad. Problems never go away, but then neither do the solutions. It’s all about focus. Where there’s a problem, there’s a solution, because a problem without a solution isn’t a problem, and isn’t worth worrying about. Concentrate one hundred percent on finding alternatives for obstacles that you find in your way.

4. COMMITMENT TO OTHERS
As the proverb says: “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together”. To be successful, being talented, intelligent and hard working isn’t enough. Success is achieved by teams. No hermit has ever been an example to others in life. Therefore, you must have a positive attitude to people. On your own you’re very restricted. We all have weaknesses that we need to compensate with other people’s strengths. What you know is always outweighed by what you don’t know. Furthermore, new ideas always spring from contact with others. Many things are resolved in informal chats. Look after and cultivate your network of contacts. And that means three things: staying in touch, connecting with people and contributing value.

5. COMMITMENT TO 
You’re never going to find all the answers all at once. No biography, either personal or professional, is a straight line. There will be bad times, like there are for all other successful people. When things don’t go your way, there will be moments of doubt when you’ll have less confidence in yourself. What truly has merit is struggling on when you’ve had enough. Most people give up. It’s essential to be strong mentally. He who resists, wins. Being successful is about persevering when others give up. 90% of being successful is insisting, trying time and again to be where you want to be.

5 types of commitment to ensure success

Francisco Alcaide

Invited firm: Francisco Alcaide Hernández

 

Expert in Personal Development and Management
www.franciscoalcaide.com | @falcaide

If there is one variable that sets successful people apart it’s a commitment to achieving their goals.And that means doing what is necessary for as long as necessary. Specifically, commitment can be divided into five types to ensure success. These are:

1. COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE
Excellent people are offered excellent opportunities. Normal people are offered normal opportunities. And bad people are not offered opportunities. Leave mediocrity aside once and for all. Always ask yourself how you can add more value to what you do: be faster, cheaper, offer better quality. Don’t settle for average work. It’s easily perceived and works against you. Remember: be so good at what you do that it’s impossible for others to ignore you. When you do something (lecture, post, workshop, class), give it your all. Life gives you back what you give it: the more you give to others, the more you’ll get back. As David Schwartz says in Aprendiendo de los mejores (Alienta, 6ª edition): «There is never competition at the top; competition is at a mediocre level».

2. COMMITMENT TO LEARNING
You can’t win more by giving less. If you want your life to improve, you need to improve. Never stop investing in yourself and your business. Always assign resources to your personal development (books, seminars, audiobooks, meals with interesting people) and what you do: improving the website, the sales channels, the PR, the advertising, whatever. Part of your income should always be allocated to that type of investment. Today, he who does not advance, retreats; he who doesn’t improve, worsens. In brief: Do you want to earn an above average income? Then become an above average person. Your personal development is your goal. Your income can only grow as much as you grow.

3. COMMITMENT TO SOLUTIONS
Successful people are focused on solutions. Unsuccessful people are focused on excuses. The problem of looking for excuses is that if you look for them, you’ll always find them. It’s never hard to find someone to blame. Life is about managing problems, one after another: problems with suppliers, with clients, with collaborators… Not having problems is a real problem, because it means that you’re not doing anything, and that’s really bad. Problems never go away, but then neither do the solutions. It’s all about focus. Where there’s a problem, there’s a solution, because a problem without a solution isn’t a problem, and isn’t worth worrying about. Concentrate one hundred percent on finding alternatives for obstacles that you find in your way.

4. COMMITMENT TO OTHERS
As the proverb says: “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together”. To be successful, being talented, intelligent and hard working isn’t enough. Success is achieved by teams. No hermit has ever been an example to others in life. Therefore, you must have a positive attitude to people. On your own you’re very restricted. We all have weaknesses that we need to compensate with other people’s strengths. What you know is always outweighed by what you don’t know. Furthermore, new ideas always spring from contact with others. Many things are resolved in informal chats. Look after and cultivate your network of contacts. And that means three things: staying in touch, connecting with people and contributing value.

5. COMMITMENT TO 
You’re never going to find all the answers all at once. No biography, either personal or professional, is a straight line. There will be bad times, like there are for all other successful people. When things don’t go your way, there will be moments of doubt when you’ll have less confidence in yourself. What truly has merit is struggling on when you’ve had enough. Most people give up. It’s essential to be strong mentally. He who resists, wins. Being successful is about persevering when others give up. 90% of being successful is insisting, trying time and again to be where you want to be.